Hill Lists

Munros

The list of distinct Scottish peaks of 3000ft (914.4m) and over, of "sufficient separation" from their neighbouring peaks. The list that was originally drawn up by Sir H.T. Munro in the Scottish Mountaineering Club Journal in 1891 was unfinished at the time of his death. Munro did not write down a precise definition of what he meant by "sufficient separation", though the character of a mountain did enter into it. Through regular use these hills have become known as the Munros. The current list contains 282 peaks.

The SMC maintains the list of Munros. In recent times the list has only been altered to reflect updates to nationally recognised topographic data (i.e. data recognised and adopted by the Ordnance Survey). We record all such changes as hill news.

F.F. Bonsall made attempts to arrive at a definition of what is a separate mountain in two articles in the SMC Journal (1973, 1974). Bonsall, a mathematician, looked at the separation of a top from all higher ground, rather than just the separation from higher tops. He used as his basis Naismith's Rule, an approximation of the time required to walk from one point to another taking into account horizontal distance and height gain. Naismith's Rule, as used by Bonsall, was 20 minutes for every mile of horizontal distance, and 3 minutes for every 100 feet of ascent. Bonsall defined his "sufficient separation" as 30 minutes of walking. Using this definition he found very good agreement with Munro's original list; according to Bonsall (at the time) 7 Munros should have be demoted, and 12 tops promoted.

Munro Tops

The list of distinct Scottish peaks of 3000ft and over, that fail to meet the criteria of "sufficient separation" from their neighbouring peaks (see above). There are currently 227 Munro Tops.

Furths

The list of peaks of 3000ft or more within the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland outside (furth) of Scotland. There are currently 34 Furths.


Corbetts

The list of all peaks in Scotland with a height of 2500ft (762m) or more and less than 3000ft (914.4m) with a drop of at least 500ft (152.4m) between each peak and any higher land. The Corbetts are more clearly defined than is the case with the Munros, only the aforementioned rules and sufficiently detailed topographic data are necessary to reproduce the list of hills in the set.

John Rooke Corbett was a district valuer based in Bristol and a keen member of the Scottish Mountaineering Club (SMC) in the years between the two World Wars. He was a distinguished student at Cambridge University and an original member of the Rucksack Club. Corbett was a regular attendee at SMC meets, a committee member and joint editor of the second edition of the Northern Highlands guidebook. He completed the Munros and Tops in 1930, only the second person to do so and, more remarkably, he climbed all Scotland's 2000ft hills.

When Corbett died, his list was passed to the SMC by his sister. As has been the case with the Munros, the list of Corbetts has changed over the years as a result of changes in hill and bealach heights recognised by the Ordnance Survey. There are currently 222 Corbetts.

Corbett Tops

The list of all peaks in Scotland with a height of 2500ft (762m) or more and less than 3000ft (914.4m) with a drop of at least 30m between each peak and any higher land. There are currently 455 Corbett Tops in addition to the Corbetts.


Grahams

The list of all distinct peaks in Scotland which are 2000ft (609.6m) or more and less than 2500ft (762m) with a drop of at least 150m between each peak and any higher land. Like the Corbetts, this list is well defined and requires only the aforementioned rules and sufficiently detailed topographic data to reproduce the list of hills in the set.

Scottish hills within this height range were previously called Elsies (short for Lesser Corbetts - LCs). In 1992 Fiona Torbet (née Graham) published her own, similar, list of these hills. The original list of Elsies, and the new list were rationalised and combined by Fiona Torbet and Alan Dawson and this set of hills became known as the Grahams. The list of Grahams is now maintained by Alan Dawson and can be found on The Relative Hills of Britain website.

There are 219 Grahams, spead over the whole of Scotland - even seven of the Scottish Islands contain Grahams.

Graham Tops

The list of all peaks in Scotland with a height of 2000ft (609.6m) or more and less than 2500ft (762m) with a drop of at least 30m between each peak and any higher land. There are currently 777 Graham Tops in addition to the Grahams.


Donalds

Donald Tops are defined as elevations in the Scottish Lowlands of at least 2000ft (610m) in height with a drop of at least 50ft (15.2m) between each elevation and any higher elevation. Further, elevations separated from higher elevations by a drop of less than 100ft (30.5m) are required to have "sufficient topographical merit".

Donalds, or Donald Hills, are subsequently defined from Donald Tops, where a Hill is the highest Top with a separation of 17 units or less. A unit is either one twelfth of a mile along a Top's connecting ridge or 50ft (30.5m) in elevation between the Top and its connecting bealach/col. The separation is the sum of these two measures.

Percy Donald devised the list and it was published in the SMC Journal in 1935. Like the Munros, the Donalds are not well defined as Donald did not state what he meant by "sufficient topographical merit" for those potential Tops with a drop of between 50ft and 100ft.

The 17 units rule, can be considered a maximum "walking time" - similar to using Naismith's rule but more generous in the relative time allocated for height gain. 17 of Donald's units represents slightly under 30 minutes using Naismith's rule. So Donald Hills must be more than c30 minutes walk apart.

There are currently 89 Donald Hills and a further 51 Donald Tops.